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One Wire Communication 1200 Points 1.500 K Gates 100 MHz 130 nm  
In some particular application, few pin count but still need chip to chip communication. This IP use one wire bi-direction (open drain) to communication. Just like UART , it is consist of one TX and one RX. User can define their own payload freedomly.   All devices are connecting through open-drain pull high bus. Every device can send data to others actively. Waveform                                 Application       - Analog IC debug      - MCU program port      - Low pin count IC Introduction
SPI slave in mode 3 1000 Points 256.000 Gates 285 MHz 130 nm  
The Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) bus, established by Motorola, is a synchronous serial data link. It operates in master/slave and full duplex styles. That is, when a master device initiates a transaction and communicates with a certain slave device, they exchange data bit-by-bit. Furthermore, the single master communication is applied to the SPI bus. Thus, there is always a single master device (with one or more slave devices) on it.The SPI bus contains 4 wires, with each named SCK, MOSI, MISO and SS_n respectively. You may also find alternative naming conventions elsewhere. The following table lists their functions and directions:The typical SPI bus architecture is designed as follows:When the SPI master device wants to communicate with a certain slave device, it asserts the SS_n line of that slave device, and then exchange data using the MOSI and MISO lines based on the toggling SCK line.With clock polarity (CPOL) and clock phase (CPHA) set to different values, the SPI bus can operate in 4 modes. These modes are listed in the following table, where provide means that the communicating master and slave devices provide data on the MOSI and MISO lines respectively on the other hand, capture means that the communicating master and slave devices capture data on the MISO and MOSI lines respectively: Introduction
SPI slave in mode 0 1000 Points 274.000 Gates 243 MHz 130 nm  
The Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) bus, established by Motorola, is a synchronous serial data link. It operates in master/slave and full duplex styles. That is, when a master device initiates a transaction and communicates with a certain slave device, they exchange data bit-by-bit. Furthermore, the single master communication is applied to the SPI bus. Thus, there is always a single master device (with one or more slave devices) on it. The SPI bus contains 4 wires, with each named SCK, MOSI, MISO and SS_n respectively. You may also find alternative naming conventions elsewhere. The following table lists their functions and directions: The typical SPI bus architecture is designed as follows:   When the SPI master device wants to communicate with a certain slave device, it asserts the SS_n line of that slave device, and then exchange data using the MOSI and MISO lines based on the toggling SCK line. With clock polarity (CPOL) and clock phase (CPHA) set to different values, the SPI bus can operate in 4 modes. These modes are listed in the following table, where provide means that the communicating master and slave devices provide data on the MOSI and MISO lines respectively on the other hand, capture means that the communicating master and slave devices capture data on the MISO and MOSI lines respectively:   Introduction
SPI slave in mode 1 1000 Points 276.000 Gates 285 MHz 130 nm  
The Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) bus, established by Motorola, is a synchronous serial data link. It operates in master/slave and full duplex styles. That is, when a master device initiates a transaction and communicates with a certain slave device, they exchange data bit-by-bit. Furthermore, the single master communication is applied to the SPI bus. Thus, there is always a single master device (with one or more slave devices) on it. The SPI bus contains 4 wires, with each named SCK, MOSI, MISO and SS_n respectively. You may also find alternative naming conventions elsewhere. The following table lists their functions and directions: The typical SPI bus architecture is designed as follows: When the SPI master device wants to communicate with a certain slave device, it asserts the SS_n line of that slave device, and then exchange data using the MOSI and MISO lines based on the toggling SCK line. With clock polarity (CPOL) and clock phase (CPHA) set to different values, the SPI bus can operate in 4 modes. These modes are listed in the following table, where provide means that the communicating master and slave devices provide data on the MOSI and MISO lines respectively on the other hand, capture means that the communicating master and slave devices capture data on the MISO and MOSI lines respectively:   Introduction
SPI slave in mode 2 1000 Points 254.000 Gates 192 MHz 130 nm  
The Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) bus, established by Motorola, is a synchronous serial data link. It operates in master/slave and full duplex styles. That is, when a master device initiates a transaction and communicates with a certain slave device, they exchange data bit-by-bit. Furthermore, the single master communication is applied to the SPI bus. Thus, there is always a single master device (with one or more slave devices) on it. The SPI bus contains 4 wires, with each named SCK, MOSI, MISO and SS_n respectively. You may also find alternative naming conventions elsewhere. The following table lists their functions and directions: The typical SPI bus architecture is designed as follows: When the SPI master device wants to communicate with a certain slave device, it asserts the SS_n line of that slave device, and then exchange data using the MOSI and MISO lines based on the toggling SCK line. With clock polarity (CPOL) and clock phase (CPHA) set to different values, the SPI bus can operate in 4 modes. These modes are listed in the following table, where provide means that the communicating master and slave devices provide data on the MOSI and MISO lines respectively on the other hand, capture means that the communicating master and slave devices capture data on the MISO and MOSI lines respectively:   Introduction
Asynchronous I2C Slave 999 Points 578.000 Gates 100 MHz 130 nm  
Unlike Synchronous type I2C slave design need clock to work. This Asynchronous type don’t need base clock . It is very power saving in some application     Application :    - Power manager IC   - Sensor IC   - Software wakeup requirement system Introduction
Clock divider by 3 100 Points 52.000 Gates 370 MHz 130 nm  
There are 2 types of circuits in digital logic world. One is combinational, and the other is sequential. The difference between them is that the latter one has storage (memory) while the former one does not. Thus, in contrast to combinational circuits, whose output depends only on the current values of its inputs, the output of sequential circuits depends not only on the current values of its inputs but also on the past values of them. Based on the characteristic of sequential circuits, we can build counters. In addition, we can further build clock dividers with the counters we designed Introduction
UART Serial Interface Controller By Quotes None 300 MHz None  
UART compatible Serial Interface Controller with receive and transmit FIFOs and support for all standard bit rates from 9600 to 921600 baud.    Applications UART Communications RS232, RS422, RS485 etc. Micro-controller interfacing Introduction
I2C Master Serial Interface Controller By Quotes None 300 MHz None  
Master serial controller compatible with the popular Philips® I2C standard. Features a simple command interface and permits multiple I2C slaves to be controlled directly from  ASIC device. Supports standard (100 kbits/s), fast (400 kbits/s) and custom data rates well above 4 Mbits/s. Setup and hold-times on the SDA pin are fully configurable.    Applications Inter-chip board-level communications Standard 2-wire comms between a wide range of peripherals, MCUs and COTs ICs   Introduction
I2C Slave Serial Interface Controller By Quotes None 300 MHz None  
Slave serial controller compatible with the popular Philips® I2C standard. Permits an I2C Master to communicate with your ASIC device via a set of user-defined config and status registers. Supports standard (100 kbits/s), fast (400 kbits/s) and custom rates in excess of 4 Mbits/s.    Applications I2C slave communication via your ASIC Inter-chip board-level communications Introduction
μIP Price Logic Gate Count Clock Rate Technology   Ratings

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